Question: Who Is Exempt From TV Licence?

Is the free TV Licence going to be scrapped?

The free TV licence for people aged 75 or over has been scrapped, but many of the five million impacted are only just being told what to do – and have yet to be asked to pay up..

Is TV Licence cheaper for pensioners?

Reduced TV Licence fees Anyone aged 75 or over receiving Pension Credit is eligible to apply for a free TV Licence, paid for by the BBC. Pension Credit can be in the name of the licence holder, or in their partner’s name if they are a couple. Residents may qualify for a discounted TV Licence fee of £7.50.

Do I have to pay TV Licence if I don’t watch BBC?

You don’t need a TV Licence if you never watch or record programmes as they’re being shown on TV, on any channel, or live on an online TV service, and you never download or watch BBC programmes on iPlayer – live, catch up or on demand. … Find out more about when you need a TV Licence.

Can I refuse to pay TV Licence to the BBC?

People who refuse to pay their TV licence will no longer face criminal sanctions under plans by the government to overhaul the BBC. Not purchasing a licence, which currently costs £157.50 a year, would instead be punishable by a fine enforced in the civil courts and by bailiffs.

Who is exempt from paying for a TV Licence?

People who are aged 75 or over and receive Pension Credit. People who are blind (severely sight impaired). People who live in qualifying residential care and are disabled or over 60 and retired. For businesses that provide units of overnight accommodation, for example, hotels and mobile units.

How can I avoid paying my TV Licence legally?

You don’t need a TV licence to watch programmes on catch-up TV services, with the exception of the BBC’s iPlayer. You can watch anything stored on services such as ITV Hub, All 4 and My5, as long as you don’t watch live TV. These services are, after all, paid for by advertising.